Carrie Grant speaks about daughter Talia’s battle with autism

In February she spoke about the struggles of raising a family with complex behavioural issues including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism.

And Carrie Grant has opened up about her daughter Talia’s battle with autism as well as her family life in a candid interview on Monday’s episode of Lorraine, in aid of the National Autistic Society’s World Autism Awareness Week 

The 52-year-old vocal coach appeared with her 16-year-old daughter, who has Aspergers (a form of autism) and dyscalculia, a learning disability which affects people using number related concepts, such as arithmetic. 

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Candid: Carrie Grant has opened up about her daughter Talia's (both above) battle with autism as well as her family life in a candid interview on Monday's episode of Lorraine, in aid of the National Autistic Society’s World Autism Awareness Week Candid: Carrie Grant has opened up about her daughter Talia's (both above) battle with autism as well as her family life in a candid interview on Monday's episode of Lorraine, in aid of the National Autistic Society’s World Autism Awareness Week

Candid: Carrie Grant has opened up about her daughter Talia’s (both above) battle with autism as well as her family life in a candid interview on Monday’s episode of Lorraine, in aid of the National Autistic Society’s World Autism Awareness Week

Carrie and husband David, 61, have four children in all, with each suffering from various behavioral disorders, -actress Olivia, 23, suffers from ADHD and dyspraxia, the couple’s 12-year-old daughter Imogen is also autistic and has ADHD, 

Their youngest son Nathan – adopted from the age of two – has ADHD and attachment issues. 

Determined to raise awareness of the condition Carrie said: ‘There are huge advantages and challenges, that’s our reality, we’ve normalised that reality, Talia is really creative and we are so proud of her.’  

‘When you are first told your child is autistic, people ask does your child speak, all these other questions. 

Interview: The 52-year-old vocal coach appeared with her 16-year-old daughter, who has Aspergers (a form of autism) and dyscalculia, a learning disability which affects people using number related concepts, such as arithmetic Interview: The 52-year-old vocal coach appeared with her 16-year-old daughter, who has Aspergers (a form of autism) and dyscalculia, a learning disability which affects people using number related concepts, such as arithmetic

Interview: The 52-year-old vocal coach appeared with her 16-year-old daughter, who has Aspergers (a form of autism) and dyscalculia, a learning disability which affects people using number related concepts, such as arithmetic

‘For someone like Talia, it shows as their anxiety is through the roof, she’d be sitting there looking calm, those unpredictable things, life is unpredictable, like going to school can be stressful.’  

After watching a video showing the daily struggles of a girl with autism Talia said: ‘That’s my everyday experience, watching that I really related to it because it’s what I go through on a daily basis, it can be really stressful to do everyday things like travelling. ‘ 

‘Structure is really important for me, I need to know what my day is going to be like, any change can be disruptive.’ 

Family first: Determined to raise awareness of the condition Carrie said: 'There are huge advantages and challenges, that’s our reality, we’ve normalised that reality, Talia is really creative and we are so proud of her' Family first: Determined to raise awareness of the condition Carrie said: 'There are huge advantages and challenges, that’s our reality, we’ve normalised that reality, Talia is really creative and we are so proud of her'

Family first: Determined to raise awareness of the condition Carrie said: ‘There are huge advantages and challenges, that’s our reality, we’ve normalised that reality, Talia is really creative and we are so proud of her’

Inspiration: After watching a video showing the daily struggles of a girl with autism Talia said: ‘That’s my everyday experience, watching that I really related to it because it’s what I go through on a daily basis, it can be really stressful to do everyday things like travelling' Inspiration: After watching a video showing the daily struggles of a girl with autism Talia said: ‘That’s my everyday experience, watching that I really related to it because it’s what I go through on a daily basis, it can be really stressful to do everyday things like travelling'

Inspiration: After watching a video showing the daily struggles of a girl with autism Talia said: ‘That’s my everyday experience, watching that I really related to it because it’s what I go through on a daily basis, it can be really stressful to do everyday things like travelling’

Asked about actor Jules Robertson, who himself is autistic and plays a character with the condition on Holby City, Carrie praised the hospital drama. 

She said: ‘We’re getting different images of autism out there now, we’ve got to learn about it, we have, Talia has. We need more characters like this actually.’ 

Talia added; ‘Autism is not really represented , people see me and think I don’t have it, she looks like everyone else, there’s a lot inside going on, ten times more than everyone else

‘We need more autistic girls, I feel they are very underrepresented, a lot of the time people only see autism in boys.’

Praise: Asked about actor Jules Robertson, who himself is autistic and plays a character with the condition on Holby City, Carrie praised the hospital drama saying : ‘We need more characters like this actually' Praise: Asked about actor Jules Robertson, who himself is autistic and plays a character with the condition on Holby City, Carrie praised the hospital drama saying : ‘We need more characters like this actually'

Praise: Asked about actor Jules Robertson, who himself is autistic and plays a character with the condition on Holby City, Carrie praised the hospital drama saying : ‘We need more characters like this actually’

Support: Carrie also gave advice for supporting people with behavioural conditions, 'If you see someone in the tube and they look anxious, or in the supermarket,don’t avoid them, don’t look away.' Support: Carrie also gave advice for supporting people with behavioural conditions, 'If you see someone in the tube and they look anxious, or in the supermarket,don’t avoid them, don’t look away.'

Support: Carrie also gave advice for supporting people with behavioural conditions, ‘If you see someone in the tube and they look anxious, or in the supermarket,don’t avoid them, don’t look away.’

 Carrie also gave advice for supporting people with behavioural conditions.

‘When I was younger my mum told me if there is someone with a white cane, you help them across the street. But it can be difficult if you don;t know. If you see someone in the tube and they look anxious, or in the supermarket,don’t avoid them, don’t look away.’

‘If your children have extreme special interests, I would be saying there’s some signs there, or if they don’t like their food touching.  

Proud: Carrrie smiled  as she posed with her middle daughter at the show  Proud: Carrrie smiled  as she posed with her middle daughter at the show 

Proud: Carrrie smiled  as she posed with her middle daughter at the show 

Carrie and David also revealed their son Nathan was forced to change schools, after being ostracised by his peers’ parents due to his unpredictable behaviour.

They went onto say that their home implements the ‘all are welcome’ policy, following the bustling atmosphere of David’s Jamaican upbringing.     

Carrie and David first rose to fame in the early 2000s as judges on Fame Academy and Pop Idol, as well as working as vocal coaches for many years.

David also won an army of fans as a member of the 1980s funk group Linx. 

Fame: Carrie and David first rose to fame in the early 2000s as judges on Fame Academy and Pop Idol, as well as working as vocal coaches for many years Fame: Carrie and David first rose to fame in the early 2000s as judges on Fame Academy and Pop Idol, as well as working as vocal coaches for many years

Fame: Carrie and David first rose to fame in the early 2000s as judges on Fame Academy and Pop Idol, as well as working as vocal coaches for many years

 

 

 

  

 

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